Human Genetics Unit

In situ hybridisation to NFATc1 in E14.5 mouse hindlimb.


Medical Research Council
Human Genetics Unit

 

 

 

 


The MRC Human Genetics Unit is at the forefront of research into human genetics. Its role is to advance the understanding of genetic factors implicated in human disease and normal and abnormal development and physiology.

 

It is situated at the Western General Hospital campus in Edinburgh and is a partner in the MRC Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine at The University of Edinburgh.

 

Mission Statement

  • To pursue the areas of science supported at the quinquennial review and to develop new areas of science which are commensurate with the Unit's remit and scientific/human health needs.
  • To promote an interdisciplinary approach to problems and to encourage both national and international collaboration.
  • To provide a productive research and training environment which will maximise the potential of individuals at all stages of their training/careers, and consequently contribute towards benefiting the needs of users and beneficiaries (e.g. scientific and clinical research community, providers of health care, the UK's research manpower base).
  • To ensure the timely transfer of technology and knowledge.
  • To provide advice on work within the Unit's remit, and disseminate this knowledge to the scientific/clinical community and the public as appropriate.

 

Aims

“The unit aims to gain an understanding of the molecular basis of genetic disease and normal human development, and to understand the role of nuclear and cytoplasmic organisation in regulating the flow of information from DNA to an organism. Population genetics also plays an important role, in helping to identify genetic risk factors in common disease. We're always keen to take our work forward and to investigate opportunities for possible therapies.”

 

Professor Nicholas Hastie CBE FRS FRSE
Director, MRC Human Genetics Unit

 

Scientific aims:

  • To gain an understanding of the molecular basis of genetic disease and normal human development
  • To identify genetic risk factors in common disease in isolated populations
  • To develop animal model systems to study human genetic disease and mammalian development
  • To understand the role of nuclear and cytoplasmic organisation in regulating the flow of information from DNA to the organism
  • To investigate opportunities for novel therapeutic approaches including stem cell therapy

Further information can be found on our research pages.